9 July 2018 – Photo gallery from 8th summer University of Byzantine studies
July 9, 2018
28 November 2018 – Launch of an international Byzantine-inspired jewelry competition titled: “BYZANTINE CHARM”
November 29, 2018

AMENDMENTS – ADDITIONS TO THE AWARD GUIDELINES OF THE CONTEST  “BYZANTINE CHARM”

 

  1. Award Notification
  2. Organizing Committee and Jury
  3. Exploitation Rights

We quote the notice as it stands

PURPOSE OF THE AWARD

The purpose of the award is:

  • The promotion of Thessaloniki as a Byzantine city through the design and creation of a modern Byzantine jewelry as a cultural “ambassador” of the Byzantine heritage of the city.
  • Recognizing creativity, innovation and originality in the work of a promising jewelry designer, who has significant potential for the creation of new designs, and closely approaches the creation of innovative handmade jewelry.
  • The evolution of the artist’s career.

 

ENTRY CRITERIA

Their candidacy for the Byzantium-inspired Jewelry Design Contest can submit:

  • Producers/designers of wearable art jewelry
  • Students of gold/silversmith jewelry Colleges
  • Professional Jewelry Designers
  • Students of Jewelry art and design Colleges
  • Professionals – Companies (from Greece and abroad) established in the field of jewelry industry

 

PRESENTATION OF PROJECTS

  • Projects to be submitted must be strictly personal, without the oversight of third parties.
  • The projects to be submitted must be characterized by innovative and original elements and not having participated in another jewelry contest.

Projects must be original designs in 3D. Optionally they can be delivered as cad files (rhino / matrix etc.) or in 3D color sketches. In the case that the designer presents his drawing in 3D at hand, he has to deliver it on a 0,35×0,50 cardboard that will accompany the drawing from A4 white paper or paper web pages where there will be the linear technical drawings of the jewelry (view, plan view, side views, cuts) and linear details of the fasteners and the connection, as well as the necessary explanations

  • The jewelry to be designed should be productive. That is to say, it covers the construction specifications which will make it both productive and commercial in terms of its final price for making it available to the public. In this context, it is stated that its retail price may range from € 50 to € 200 for the gift line and from € 500 or more for the luxury range, taking into account that the jewelry to be produced needs to be traded at a price not prohibiting the realization of its goal of creation, determined by the diffusion of elements of Byzantine civilization into modern reality.
  • The sample of the final product may be in:
  1. Silver 925 or 950
  2. Yellow gold 18ct or 22ct

Gems or enamel can be used

  • The final sample must also be accompanied by an original wax model
  • Each project is required to be accompanied by a text with a maximum of 200 words. A source of inspiration for the creation of jewelry must be the Byzantine history and the issues that the Organizing Committee gives to the candidate designer jewelry contestants *

The design needs to be reproducible in other categories of jewelry beyond the original. The following options are indicated:

 Necklace

 Bracelet

 Earrings

 Ring (male / female)

 Brooch

 Cross

 Object (Press Papier, Folder, Stationery, etc)

The deliverable will be based on the issues raised by the Organizing Committee, but the candidates will have to present a jewelry inspired by Byzantine style in a contemporary fashion so that the end result / product is practical and commercial. That is to say, it covers the construction specifications which will make it commercial in terms of its final price for making it available to the public.

The final jewelry will bear on the back the manufacturer’s seal, the seal of determination of the purity of the metal from which it was made and there may be an additional seal, the sign of the carrier supporting it.

The final jewel will be accompanied by a written certification with a photograph of the original, as well as a complete analysis of the quality of the gems if it has, and its specifications

* Competition’s issues are given in detail on the annex attached

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

First round: (28/11/2018)

  1. The Artist Curriculum Vitae and the concise profile of the jewelry company (800-1000 words), where it exists.
  2. The following information also included in the application:
  • Completion date and level of vocational training (BA BFA, MA, MFA and month / year of graduation, or if the artist is self-taught)
  • Represented by a company / organization or Jewelry Gallery (yes / no). If so, please give the company name / organization / Jewelry gallery
  • Source of information about the contest (eg, trainer, school information, curator, gallery owner, SNAG News, magazine, collector)
  • Certificate of enrollment in the relevant professional chamber
  • Artist’s portfolio with its previous creations

Especially for students it is required Certificate of attendance by the faculty they are attending

 

Second round: (1/4/2019)

The projects to be submitted will be accompanied by a closed and sealed envelope, attached to the back of the drawings, in which:

  • Designs affixed to hardboard of 0,50×0,35 regardless of whether the dimensions of the individual drawing or individual designs are smaller.
  • Up to 10 photos / rendering. The jewelry must be presented from different angles (front, rear side view, lateral view and, if necessary, detailed illustration of the clasps or other special features of the design).
  • A photograph in which the jewelry is worn.
  • Photographs must be high resolution (4000x4000dpi / 6-7MB or higher in psd / png / TIFF types) so they can be used in the printed form for promotional purposes if they are selected as a finalist *
  • In each photo must be written:
  1. The name of the designer / company / jewelry organization
  2. The title of the jewelry
  3. The date of manufacture
  4. Technical information on the construction (grms, degree of metal purity, dimensions, number and carat stone, etc.) must be provided.
  5. The materials used for the jewelry
  6. Photo copyright

The First’s round requirements must be submitted by all applicants on the following email: byzantinethessaloniki@hotmail.com

The closed and sealed envelope which will accompany the projects of the Second round must be submitted at the offices of Traders’ Association of Thessaloniki, 1, Morichovou Sq. 5th floor, 546 25, Thessaloniki

* The number of finalists will be 10% of the final entries

 

OBLIGATIONS OF THE WINNER AND RUNNER UPS

  • The winning artist is required to be prepared to carry out a project on behalf of a jeweler or jeweler manufacturer or goldsmith.
  • The winning artist is expected to travel to the awards ceremony and present his work.
  • The winner and the first two runners-up will be invited to participate and present their creation during the award ceremony.

 

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

  • Traders’ Association of Thessaloniki: Pantelis Philippidis, President of THAT
  • TIF-HELEXPO: Anna Tobazi, Manager of Exhibitions Dep.
  • Hellenic Federation of Silversmiths Goldsmiths Jewellers & Watch Retailers: Petros Kalpakidis, President of HFSGJWR
  • Ephorate of Antiquities of Thessaloniki Region: George Skiadaresis, Director
  • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki:

–  Centre of Byzantine Resarch of A.U.TH.: Dr. Konstantinos Christou, President of CBR

–  School of Economics of A.U.TH.: Dr. Stella Kostopoulou, Assistant Professor

  • Byzantine Thessaloniki: Paolo Odorico, Director of EHESS, Dr. Panagiotis Kampanis, Archaeologist of Museum of Byzantine Culture of Thessaloniki and Ms. Hara Papadopoulou, Project Coordinator

 

JURY

The following bodies form the Jury, with the relevant persons

  • Traders’ Association of Thessaloniki: Pantelis Philippidis, President of TATH, Mr. Stamatis Marinis, Board Member of TATH
  • TIF-HELEXPO: Theodora Kanakidou, Director of Congresses Dep.
  • Association of Jewelers and Watchmakers of Thessaloniki: Evi Dimolaidou, General Secretary
  • Ephorate of Antiquities of Thessaloniki Region: Ms. Krino Konstantinidou, Archaeologist
  • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki:

–  Centre of Byzantine Research of A.U.TH.: Dr. Natalia Poulou, Prof. Department of Archaeology and History of Ancient and Byzantine Art and Civilization

–  School of Economics of A.U.TH.: Dr. Stella Kostopoulou, Assistant Professor

  • University of Western Macedonia, Department of Fine and Applied Arts (Florina): Giannis Ziogas, Dean of School of Fine Arts, Assistant Professor
  • Attilio Contognato, Jeweler’s Designer
  • Byzantine Thessaloniki: Paolo Odorico, Director of EHESS, Dr. Panagiotis Kampanis, Archaeologist of Museum of Byzantine Culture of Thessaloniki and Ms. Hara Papadopoulou, Project Coordinator

EVALUATION CRITERIAS

The Critical Committee will decide on the designs of the competitors taking into account the following:

  • Commerciality
  • Idea conception
  • Technical Knowledge
  • Visual presentation
  • Innovation

 

Opening Ceremony (28/11/2018)

 

Closing Ceremony (10/7/2019)

 

 REASONS FOR EXCLUSION OF COMPETITORS

  • Projects that have already been published and / or presented to social media will be withdrawn from the competition
  • Incomplete and delayed entries will not be considered for evaluation
  • Identification of items in visible parts of the contestant, for the purpose of recognition by members of the Jury
  • Failure to comply with the terms of the Regulation
  • Competitors who are members of the Organizing Committee or/and the Jury or have a degree of affinity with them
  • Objection for project selection is accepted within three months

 

AWARD

  • Commemorative praise for the successful participation of the finalists in the competition. Travel and accommodation costs for the event will be covered by the organizers.
  • Awards: 1st prize of 3.000 €, 2nd prize of 2.000 € & 3rd prize of 1.000 €.

  

EXPLOITATION RIGHTS

  • The rights of exploitation of all contestants belong to the “BYZANTINE THESSALONIKI” Organization.
  • Copyright belongs to the creators. The first three winning creators will have a two-year contract with the “BYZANTINE THESSALONIKI” Organization and a 5% to 10% share of the final net proceeds from the sale of their jewelry (excluding taxes, transport costs, credit card payments, etc.). The management of the award of the jewelry is owned by the Organization.

 

AWARD NOTIFICATION

After the extensions to the submission of applications, the timetable is as follows:

 

First Round

  • 28/11/2018: Online announcement of the competition on the website of “BYZANTINE THESSALONIKI”
  • 28/11/2018 – 17/3/2019: Submission of the participation requests of the interested candidates
  • 18/3/2019 – 23/3/2019: Selection of the candidates by the Jury based on the CURRICULUM VITAE, their EXPERIENCE IN THE FIELD & THE PORTFOLIO WITH THEIR PREVIOUS CREATIONS, in order to proceed in the second round

 

26/3/2019: Announcement of the decision of the Jury with the names of the candidates selected to take part in the second round. The decision of the Jury will be uploaded on the contest website.

 

Second Round

  • 01/4/2019 – 12/5/2019: Submission of candidates’ projects.
  • 13/5/2019 – 26/5/2019: Selection by the Jury of the 3 best jewelry designs.
  • 31/5/2019: Announcement of the decision of the Jury with the names of the winners and the runners-up, post of their personal details on the website and information by telephone contact
  • 10/7/2019: Award ceremony for the presentation of the winners and the agents who worked for “BYZANTINE THESSALONIKI”

 

 

For the smooth conduct of the competition, as supervisor will be appointed, the legal counselor of BYZANTINE THESSALONIKI

Applicants must comply with the submission requirements listed on the site.

 

The initial Award Guidelines are displayed below

BYZANTINE JEWELRY CONTEST “BYZANTINE CHARM” AWARD GUIDELINES

 PURPOSE OF THE AWARD

The purpose of the award is:

  • The promotion of Thessaloniki as a Byzantine city through the design and creation of a modern Byzantine jewelry as a cultural “ambassador” of the Byzantine heritage of the city.
  • Recognizing creativity, innovation and originality in the work of a promising jewelry designer, who has significant potential for the creation of new designs, and closely approaches the creation of innovative handmade jewelry.
  • The evolution of the artist’s career.

ENTRY CRITERIA

Their candidacy for the Byzantium-inspired Jewelry Design Contest can submit:

  • Producers/designers of wearable art jewelry
  • Students of gold/silversmith jewelry Colleges
  • Professional Jewelry Designers
  • Students of Jewelry art and design Colleges
  • Professionals – Companies (from Greece and abroad) established in the field of jewelry industry

PRESENTATION OF PROJECTS

  • Projects to be submitted must be strictly personal, without the oversight of third parties.
  • The projects to be submitted must be characterized by innovative and original elements and not having participated in another jewelry contest.

Projects must be original designs in 3D. Optionally they can be delivered as cad files (rhino / matrix etc.) or in 3D color sketches. In the case that the designer presents his drawing in 3D at hand, he has to deliver it on a 0,35×0,50 cardboard that will accompany the drawing from A4 white paper or paper web pages where there will be the linear technical drawings of the jewelry (view, plan view, side views, cuts) and linear details of the fasteners and the connection, as well as the necessary explanations

  • The jewelry to be designed should be productive. That is to say, it covers the construction specifications which will make it both productive and commercial in terms of its final price for making it available to the public. In this context, it is stated that its retail price may range from € 50 to € 200 for the gift line and from € 500 or more for the luxury range, taking into account that the jewelry to be produced needs to be traded at a price not prohibiting the realization of its goal of creation, determined by the diffusion of elements of Byzantine civilization into modern reality.
  • The sample of the final product may be in:
  1. Silver 925 or 950
  2. Yellow gold 18ct or 22ct

Gems or enamel can be used

  • The final sample must also be accompanied by an original wax model
  • Each project is required to be accompanied by a text with a maximum of 200 words. A source of inspiration for the creation of jewelry must be the Byzantine history and the issues that the Organizing Committee gives to the candidate designer jewelry contestants *

The design needs to be reproducible in other categories of jewelry beyond the original. The following options are indicated:

v Necklace

v Bracelet

v Earrings

v Ring (male / female)

v Brooch

v Cross

v Object (Press Papier, Folder, Stationery, etc)

The deliverable will be based on the issues raised by the Organizing Committee, but the candidates will have to present a jewelry inspired by Byzantine style in a contemporary fashion so that the end result / product is practical and commercial. That is to say, it covers the construction specifications which will make it commercial in terms of its final price for making it available to the public.

The final jewelry will bear on the back the manufacturer’s seal, the seal of determination of the purity of the metal from which it was made and there may be an additional seal, the sign of the carrier supporting it.

The final jewel will be accompanied by a written certification with a photograph of the original, as well as a complete analysis of the quality of the gems if it has, and its specifications

 

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

First round: (28/11/2018)

  1. The Artist Curriculum Vitae and the concise profile of the jewelry company (800-1000 words), where it exists.
  2. The following information also included in the application:
  • Completion date and level of vocational training (BA BFA, MA, MFA and month / year of graduation, or if the artist is self-taught)
  • Represented by a company / organization or Jewelry Gallery (yes / no). If so, please give the company name / organization / Jewelry gallery

* Competition’s issues are given in detail on the annex attached

  • Source of information about the contest (eg, trainer, school information, curator, gallery owner, SNAG News, magazine, collector)
  • Certificate of enrollment in the relevant professional chamber
  • Artist’s portfolio with its previous creations

Especially for students it is required Certificate of attendance by the faculty they are attending

Second round: (11/2/2019)

The projects to be submitted will be accompanied by a closed and sealed envelope, attached to the back of the drawings, in which:

  • Designs affixed to hardboard of 0,50×0,35 regardless of whether the dimensions of the individual drawing or individual designs are smaller.
  • Up to 10 photos / rendering. The jewelry must be presented from different angles (front, rear side view, lateral view and, if necessary, detailed illustration of the clasps or other special features of the design).
  • A photograph in which the jewelry is worn.
  • Photographs must be high resolution (4000x4000dpi / 6-7MB or higher in psd / png / TIFF types) so they can be used in the printed form for promotional purposes if they are selected as a finalist *
  • In each photo must be written:
  1. The name of the designer / company / jewelry organization
  2. The title of the jewelry
  3. The date of manufacture
  4. Technical information on the construction (grms, degree of metal purity, dimensions, number and carat stone, etc.) must be provided.
  5. The materials used for the jewelry
  6. Photo copyright

The First’s round requirements must be submitted by all applicants on the following email: byzantinethessaloniki@hotmail.com

The closed and sealed envelope which will accompany the projects of the Second round must be submitted at the offices of Traders’ Association of Thessaloniki, 1, Morichovou Sq. 5th floor, 546 25, Thessaloniki

 

OBLIGATIONS OF THE WINNER AND RUNNER UPS

  • The winning artist is required to be prepared to carry out a project on behalf of a jeweler or jeweler manufacturer or goldsmith.

 

* The number of finalists will be 10% of the final entries

  • The winning artist is expected to travel to the awards ceremony and present his work.
  • The winner and the first two runners-up will be invited to participate and present their creation during the award ceremony.

 

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

  • Traders’ Association of Thessaloniki: Pantelis Philippidis, President of TATH, Ms. Aggelika Mavridou, Member of TATH
  • TIF-HELEXPO: Anna Tobazi, Manager of Exhibitions Dep.
  • Hellenic Federation of Silversmiths Goldsmiths Jewellers & Watch Retailers: Petros Kalpakidis, President of HFSGJWR
  • Ephorate of Antiquities of Thessaloniki Region: George Skiadaresis, Director
  • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki:

–  Centre of Byzantine Resarch of A.U.TH.: Dr. Konstantinos Christou, President of CBR

–  School of Economics of A.U.TH.: Dr. Stella Kostopoulou, Assistant Professor

  • Byzantine Thessaloniki: Paolo Odorico, Director of EHESS, Dr. Panagiotis Kampanis, Archaeologist of Museum of Byzantine Culture of Thessaloniki and Ms. Hara Papadopoulou, Project Coordinator

JURY

The following bodies form the Jury, with the relevant persons

  • Traders’ Association of Thessaloniki: Pantelis Philippidis, President of TATH, Mr. Stamatis Marinis, Board Member of TATH and Ms. Aggelika Mavridou, Member of TATH
  • TIF-HELEXPO: Theodora Kanakidou, Director of Congresses Dep.
  • Association of Jewelers and Watchmakers of Thessaloniki: Evi Dimolaidou, General Secretary
  • Ephorate of Antiquities of Thessaloniki Region: Ms. Krino Konstantinidou, Archaeologist
  • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki:

–  Centre of Byzantine Research of A.U.TH.: Dr. Natalia Poulou, Prof. Department of Archaeology and History of Ancient and Byzantine Art and Civilization

–  School of Economics of A.U.TH.: Dr. Stella Kostopoulou, Assistant Professor

 

  • University of Western Macedonia, Department of Fine and Applied Arts (Florina): Giannis Ziogas, Dean of School of Fine Arts, Assistant Professor

 

  • Attilio Contognato, Jeweler’s Designer
  • Byzantine Thessaloniki: Paolo Odorico, Director of EHESS, Dr. Panagiotis Kampanis, Archaeologist of Museum of Byzantine Culture of Thessaloniki and Ms. Hara Papadopoulou, Project Coordinator

EVALUATION CRITERIAS

The Critical Committee will decide on the designs of the competitors taking into account the following:

  • Commerciality
  • Idea conception
  • Technical Knowledge
  • Visual presentation
  • Innovation

Opening Ceremony (28/11/2018)

Closing Ceremony (13/5/2019)

 

 

REASONS FOR EXCLUSION OF COMPETITORS

  • Projects that have already been published and / or presented to social media will be withdrawn from the competition
  • Incomplete and delayed entries will not be considered for evaluation
  • Identification of items in visible parts of the contestant, for the purpose of recognition by members of the Jury
  • Failure to comply with the terms of the Regulation
  • Competitors who are members of the Organizing Committee or/and the Jury or have a degree of affinity with them
  • Objection for project selection is accepted within three months

 

AWARD

  • Commemorative praise for the successful participation of the finalists in the competition. Travel and accommodation costs for the event will be covered by the organizers.
  • Awards: 1st prize of 3.000 €, 2nd prize of 2.000 € & 3rd prize of 1.000 €.
  • The winner will have a two-year contract with the “BYZANTINE THESSALONIKI” Organization and a 5-10% share of the final net proceeds of his/her jewelry sales (excluding taxes, transportation costs, credit card supplies, etc.). The management of the award of the jewelry is owned by the Organization.

 

AWARD NOTIFICATION

First Round

  • 28/11/2018: Online announcement of the competition on the website of “BYZANTINE THESSALONIKI”
  • 28/11/2018 – 03/2/2019: Submission of the participation requests of the interested candidates
  • 4/2/2019: Selection of the candidates by the Jury based on the CURRICULUM VITAE, their EXPERIENCE IN THE FIELD & THE PORTFOLIO WITH THEIR PREVIOUS CREATIONS, in order to proceed in the second round

6/2/2019: Announcement of the decision of the Jury with the names of the candidates selected to take part in the second round. The decision of the Jury will be uploaded on the contest website.

 

Second Round

  • 11/2/2019 – 20/3/2019: Submission of candidates’ projects.
  • 27/3/2019 – 15/4/2019: Selection by the Jury of the 3 best jewelry designs.
  • 24/4/2019: Announcement of the decision of the Jury with the names of the winners and the runners-up, post of their personal details on the website and information by telephone contact
  • 13/5/2019: Award ceremony for the presentation of the winners and the agents who worked for “BYZANTINE THESSALONIKI”

For the smooth conduct of the competition, as supervisor will be appointed, the legal counselor of BYZANTINE THESSALONIKI

Applicants must comply with the submission requirements listed on the site.

 

 

ANNEX

 

COMPETITION ISSUES

APPLICATION FORM

INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION ON JEWELRY

 

TITLE

“BYZANTINE CHARM

COMPETITION DETAILS (with * are the required fields)

    NoYes

    ANNEX: COMPETITION ISSUES

    FIBULA (BUCKLES)

    The Byzantine buckles are nothing more than the continuation of a clothing tradition from antiquity. The buckles were used to close the mantle or the tunic, and were worn over the shoulder.

    In Byzantium the fibulae were either round or oblong, often having pendants hanging from the central motif, especially if they were luxurious. Regarding to the material, the fibulae could have been simple, as safety pin, made of iron or bronze, while the luxurious ones were made of gold and adorned with precious stones.

    Most of our information comes from the mosaics, especially with regard to the golden fibulae. We also have a rich tradition of barbarian fibulae used by the Lombards and the Merovingians in France, but also in England and in the countries north of the Rhine, where the barbarian tradition was associated with the aesthetics of the Byzantines. Finally, we also find fibulae in the Slavic countries and in North Africa.

    General photos:

    The Magi in the mosaics of San Vitale of Ravenna – 6th century http://slideplayer.fr/slide/9363313/28/images/3/San+Apollinare+Nuovo,+Ravenne:+d%C3%A9tail+des+trois+rois+mages.jpg

    The Emperor Justinian at San Vitale of Ravenna – 6th century https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Meister_von_San_Vitale_in_Ravenna.jpg/222px-Meister_von_San_Vitale_in_Ravenna.jpg

    Character of the court of the Emperor Justinian in San Vitale of Ravenna- 6th century https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8b/Belisarius_mosaic.jpg

    Saint Eugene – mosaic of the 14th century

    Monastery of Saint-Sauveur -in-Chora – Kariyé Cami – Istanbul

    http://www.le-flamant-rose.org/kahriye/mosaiques.htm

    Saint George of Cappadocia – 14th century mosaic

    Monastery of Saint -Sauveur-in-Chora – Kariyé Cami – Istanbul

    http://www.le-flamant-rose.org/kahriye/mosaiques.htm

    Jewish priests –  mosaic of the 14 century

    Monastery of Saint-Sauveur-in-Chora – Kariyé Cami – Istanbul

    http://www.fhw.gr/chronos/10/images/k_pics/kb1apic1.gif

    http://www.le-flamant-rose.org/kahriye/mosaiques.htm

    Saint Tarachos mosaic of the 14 century

    Monastery of Saint-Sauveur-in-Chora – Kariyé Cami – Istanbul

    http://www.le-flamant-rose.org/kahriye/mosaiques.htm

    St. Minas– mosaic of the 14 century

    Monastery of Saint-Sauveur-in-Chora – Kariyé Cami – Istanbul

    http://www.gettyimages.fr/detail/photo-d’actualit%C3%A9/mosaics-and-paintings-in-the-byzantine-church-of-st-photo-dactualit%C3%A9/814453568#mosaics-and-paintings-in-the-byzantine-church-of-st-savior-in-chora-picture-id814453568

    Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore – Rome

    Stories of the Old and New Testaments

    5th century mosaic

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7a/MelchizAbraham.jpg

    Onyx Fibula

    200 AD – 300 AD

    Kunsthistorische Museum Wien

    https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/beta/asset/onyx-fibula/GQFuT5aeLAJaBQ

    Brooch

    4th Century AD

    Early Byzantine

    (Source: The British Museum) : https://ancientpeoples.tumblr.com/post/65720918392/brooch-4th-century-ad-early-byzantine-source

    Byzantine Silver Fibula Brooch with Cross and Inscription, c. 6th-8th Century A.D.

    UK private collection, Mr. I. Roper, 1990s.

    At auction: http://www.artemission.com/ViewItemDetails.aspx?ItemNumber=26.31642

    Inscription : VITA TIBI

    Date: ca. 430                  Medium : Gold

    Metropolitan Museum of Art – New York

    Accession Number: 1995.97

    https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection#!?q=byzantine%2520fibula&perPage=50&sortBy=Relevance&sortOrder=asc&offset=0&pageSize=0

    BYZANTINE Large Bronze Fibula. Circa 6th-8th Century AD. (38.37 gm; 70 mm)

    At auction : https://www.vcoins.com/en/stores/pars_coins/121/product/byzantine_large_bronze_fibula_circa_6th8th_century_ad_rare/607174/Default.aspx

    Date: 3th-4th century

    Metropolitan Museum of Art – New York

    Accession Number: 67.259.2

    https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/325947

    Fibula – 4th century

    The Walter Arts Museum – Baltimore

    http://art.thewalters.org/detail/7101/fibula/

    Ancient Byzantine Bronze Fibula : vendue aux enchères

    https://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/an-ancient-byzantine-bronze-fibula-216354-c-9fd418f910

    Bronze Belt Buckle – late 6th century-7th century

    The Walter Arts Museum – Baltimore

    http://art.thewalters.org/detail/3499/belt-buckle-2/

    Belt Buckle – late 6th century-7th century

    Gold, meerschaum, opal (?)

    The Walter Arts Museum – Baltimore

    http://art.thewalters.org/detail/30511/belt-buckle-12/

    Gold Belt Buckle – late 6th century-7th century

    The Walter Arts Museum – Baltimore

    http://art.thewalters.org/detail/24626/belt-buckle-5/

    A series of fibulae, with many illustrations, can be found in a study by K. Escher, “Byzantine and related loop plates of the 6th-8th century period found in France”, Archeological Review of the East 63 (2014) 301 -336, which can be read on the website:

    http://journals.openedition.org/rae/8164

    Buckle

    « Constantinople ? », British Museum

    ENTWISTLE C« Notes on Selected Recent Acquisitions of Byzantine Jewellery at the British Museum », in : ENTWISTLE C., ADAMS N. ed., Intelligible Beauty : recent research on Byzantine jewellery, The Trustees of the British Museum, p. 20-32 (British Museum Research Publication, 178), p. 20

    Katalin Escher, “Byzantine and related buckets of the 6th-8th century period found in France”, Archeological Review of the East 63 (2014) 301-336

    http://journals.openedition.org/rae/8164

    par. 35, Fig. 3/7

    Lyriforme loop plate of Charnay-lès-Chalon (Saône-et-Loire)

    Katalin Escher, “Byzantine and related buckets of the 6th-8th century period found in France”, Archeological Review of the East 63 (2014) 301-336

    http://journals.openedition.org/rae/8164

    par. 55, Fig. 6

    Loop-buckle plates found in FranceCapestang (Aude); Corbère-les-Cabanes (Pyrénées-Orientales)

    Katalin Escher, “Byzantine and related buckets of the 6th-8th century period found in France”, Archeological Review of the East 63 (2014) 301-336

    http://journals.openedition.org/rae/8164

    par. 72, Fig. 11/1, 11/2

    Belt buckle – Madrid – Archaeological Museum – provenance province of Teruel

    Katalin Escher, “Byzantine and related buckets of the 6th-8th century period found in France”, Archeological Review of the East 63 (2014) 301-336

    http://journals.openedition.org/rae/8164

    par. 68, Fig. 10/4

    Belt buckle of unknown provenance – auction

    Katalin Escher, “Byzantine and related buckets of the 6th-8th century period found in France”, Archeological Review of the East 63 (2014) 301-336

    http://journals.openedition.org/rae/8164

    par. 72, Fig. 11/2

    BYZANTINE BRONZE BUCKLE –        VIII century A.D.
    Kidney-shaped loop. Short wide tongue with cubical knob; both hinged to a openwork plate. Two perforated lugs at the rear. 2.6”(6.5 cm).

    Sold at auction

    http://www.ancienttouch.com/early-medieval_byzantine_migration-period_buckles-and%20_fibulae.htm

    BYZANTINE BRONZE BUCKLE –  SECOND HALF OF VIII century A.D.
    Kidney-shaped loop. Short tongue with flat knob. Both hinged to a triangular plate decorated with stylized floral relief . 2.3”(6.0cm).

    Sold at auction

    http://www.ancienttouch.com/early-medieval_byzantine_migration-period_buckles-and%20_fibulae.htm

    BYZANTINE INFLUENCE FIBULES

    Pair of Germanic fibulae – 6th century https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_jewelry#/media/File:Paar_Prunkfibeln.jpg

    Fibula in the shape of an eagle. Cloisonne. Around 550. Nuremberg, National Library

    Image from http://www.encyclopedie.bseditions.fr/article.php?pArticleId=155&pChapitreId=32754&pSousChapitreId=32756&pArticleLib=Gaule%A0%3A+l%92art+m%E9rovingien+%5BLes+apports+%AB%A0Barbares%A0%BB+et+l%92art+pr%E9roman-%3EL%92art+ottonien%5D

    Fibula round umbo. Decor cabochons mounted in packs, garnets and watermark

    Bossut-Gotteshain – tombe 143

    1st half of the 7th century

    Constantin Pion, «Jewelery and adornments in the Merovingian period (5th-8th)

    s.) “, in The Cro-Magnon adornment at Clovis. “There is no age (s) to make beautiful”, under the direction of P. Cattelain, N. Bozet and G. V Di Stazio, Editions Cedarc, 2012

    https://www.academia.edu/4020048/Bijoux_et_parures_vestimentaires_%C3%A0_l_%C3%A9poque_m%C3%A9rovingienne_Ve-VIIIe_s._

    1. 168, Fig. 6

     

    BYZANTINE SEALS

    The Byzantine Empire had a system of governance very efficient. Even if most documents from the archives are now lost, we have many seals (over 60,000) that were used to confirm the authenticity of the documents on which the seals were tied (Table 1-2). Most of these seals belonged to Empire’s public officers, and were made of lead, while the most official emperor’s seals were gold (the so-called golden chrysobulla) (Table 3 and 4).

    Seals were found throughout the territory of the Byzantine Empire, especially in Constantinople. Only the emperor’s seals (as well as the seals of the Kommerkiarioi, officers overseeing the trade negotiations) had the King’s image, while the others had an image or a legend.

    In general, on one side of the seal we find the image of a saint, or the Virgin Mary or Christ, while on the other side there was a legend, a small text with the name of the officer. This allows us to get to know better the Byzantine upper classes of society. Often the name of the officer was wrote in a monogram (cf. 5 to 9).

    Competitive part:

    Various imperial chrysobulls

    http://elec.enc.sorbonne.fr/cid/cid1992/art_18

     

    πίν. 2 Lead seal – 13th C Lead seal of Georgios Zagorommatos, protovestiaritis 1251 Patmos, Agios Ioannis the Theologos Monastery.

    Μολύβδινη σφραγίδα του πρωτοβεστιαρίτου Γεωργίου Ζαγορομμάτου 1251 Πάτμος, Μονή Αγίου Ιωάννη του Θεολόγου

    https://nl.pinterest.com/pin/500744052309628568/

     

    Examples of Monograms

    Seal of 6th century. The name can be Ἰωάννου or Ἀνανίου.

    Iznik – Museum – inv. 1791

    Dim. 19 mm. champ / 23 mm. tot.

    (J.Cl. Cheynet, “Seals of the Iznik Museum”, Byzantine Studies Journal  49 (1991) n° 2)

    https://www.academia.edu/730621/Les_sceaux_du_mus%C3%A9e_dIznik

    Monogram on one side and text on the other

    Seal of the patrice and General of the Armeniacs Marinos

    8th-9th century. Iznik – Museum – inv. 3565

    Dim. 26 mm.

    (J.Cl. Cheynet, “Seals of the Iznik Museum”, Review of Byzantine Studies 49 (1991) n° 9)

    https://www.academia.edu/730621/Les_sceaux_du_mus%C3%A9e_dIznik

    Text on both sides

    Seal of  Eumathios Philokalès

    12th century. Iznik – Museum – inv. 3687

    Dim. 20 mm.

    (J.Cl. Cheynet, “Seals of the Iznik Museum”, Review of Byzantine Studies 49 (1991) n° 18)

    https://www.academia.edu/730621/Les_sceaux_du_mus%C3%A9e_dIznik

    Portrait in one side and text in the other

    Seal of Théodore Dalassinos

    11th century. Coll. Zacos – National Library of France 219

    (J.Cl. Cheynet, « The Dalassinoi », in Studies prosopographies, Paris 1986, p. 431).

    https://www.academia.edu/30160346/LES_DALASS%C3%88NOI_2006_

    Two portraits

    Ἀλέξιος δεσπότης ὁ Κομνηνος   [Σεβαστ]ὸς Κωνσταντῖ[νος]

    Seal of basileus Alexis Comnène and his nephew the  sevastos Constantin Comnène

    11th century.  (G. Schlumberger, Unpublished Byzantine Seals, Third Series, Review of Greek Studies,1900, p. 10).

    Seal of  Elpidios Brachamios

    Τenth-eleventh century. Preslav Museum

    Diamètre 23 mm

    (J.Cl. Cheynet, « Les Brachamioi », in Studies prosopographies, Paris 1986, p. 380).

    https://www.academia.edu/9893571/Les_Brachamioi

    Κύριε βοήθει τῷ σῷ δούλῳ          + Έλπιδίῳ πατρικίῳ κ(αὶ)

    στρατιγ(ῷ) Σικελ(ίας)

    Seal of Elpidios,  patrice and strategos  of Sicile

    8th century. Coll. Schlumberger

    (G. Schlumberger, Unpublished Byzantine Seals, Fourth Series, Paris 1900, p. 2).

    Ὁ ἅγιος Γεώργιος           Πρωτοβεστιαρίου σφράγισμα καὶ μεγάλου στρατοπεδάρχου

    Anonyme seal of a  Protovestiairos and great  imperial Statopedarches

    Era of Paléologues. Coll. Schlumberger

    (G. Schlumberger, “Unpublished Byzantine Seals, Fourth Series”, Review of Greek Studies, 55 (1900) p. 22).

     

    Samples of Monograms

    Many photos of Byzantine seals you can find in):

    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=sceaux+byzantins&FORM=HDRSC2

     

    A female seal

    Seal of Kalè Brachamèna

    11th century.  BNF, Fonds Seyrig, inv. n° 168

    Diamètre 27 mm

    (J.Cl. Cheynet, « The Brachamioi », in Studies prosopographies, Paris 1986, p. 382).

    https://www.academia.edu/9893571/Les_Brachamioi

     

    TORCS

    The torcs were a kind of necklace that men wore in Byzantium. Maniakion comes from the “barbarians,” and in antiquity it was a jewel typical of the Sassanids and the Celts.

    In Byzantium, we have come across it from the first centuries, as a continuation of Roman clothing. Sometimes it consisted of a simple strip of leather or metal around the neck, but sometimes in the center of this strip was hanging a jewel, which could be a simple stone or more stones, or also a pendant.

    In the late antiquity, the maniakion was a personal jewel, such as pselia and the coves, and even slaves or young men of dubious behavior wore it. As far as it may seem, in Byzantium the maniakion was originally typical of the soldiers of the imperial guard, and the brightest soldiers received it as proof of their bravery. Maniacs wore the Strathores (military office), as did the generals. Subsequently, the candidates and spatharocandidates (ie people who belonged to the highest social class and who had access to the court) wore maniakia as an indication of their high position. The Emperor donated a maniakion on the day of the advance of a proto-spatharios: kneeling in front of the emperor, the candidate kissed the king’s feet, and the attendance put a maniakion around his neck.

    Typically, the maniakion was made of gold, and was braided.

    General photos:

     

    Hermae representing African guardsmen from Welschbillig

    From Z. Mráv, “Maniakion – The Golden Torc in Late Roman and Early Byzantine Army”, in T. Vida et Alii (edd.), The Frontier World. Romans, Barbarians and Military Culture, Proceedings of the International Conference, Budapest 2015 (Romania Gothica II), p. 298.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282440071_Maniakion_-_The_Golden_Torc_in_Late_Roman_and_Early_Byzantine_Army

    Mosaic of the San Vitale Church of Ravenna – 6th century

    Soldiers with maniakion around the neck

    http://serena-ilsuospazio.blogspot.fr/2011/05/mosaici-bizantini-basilica-di-san.html

    Fayum Mummies Portraits

    https://www.tumblr.com/search/fayum%20mummy%20portraits

    Child wearing a torc with pendant, finial of a tripod leg from Trier

    From Zs. Mráv, “Maniakion – The Golden Torc in Late Roman and Early Byzantine Army”, in T. Vida et Alii (edd.), The Frontier World. Romans, Barbarians and Military Culture, Proceedings of the International Conference, Budapest 2015 (Romania Gothica II), p. 299.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282440071_Maniakion_-_The_Golden_Torc_in_Late_Roman_and_Early_Byzantine_Army

    Byzantine Silver Bowl – First Cyprus Treasure – ca. 650 (Saint Sergius ?)

    British Museum

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Cyprus_Treasure

    Bracelet with Coins of Phocas and Heraclius- 7th Century

    Dumbarton Oaks collection – BZ.1938.65

    http://museum.doaks.org/Obj109230?sid=3785&x=21068&sort=76

    Detail of a 7th-century icon of Saints Sergius and Bacchus from the Monastery of St-Cathrine of Sinai

    https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/1600/1*DTdHgJkzAiIveLkC2beLdw.jpeg

    https://www.pinterest.fr/pin/493566440383381411/

    Torcs with inlaid and/or attached gemstones

    (drawing  Zs. Mráv, “Maniakion – The Golden Torc in Late Roman and Early Byzantine Army”, in T. Vida et Alii (edd.), The Frontier World. Romans, Barbarians and Military Culture, Proceedings of the International Conference, Budapest 2015 (Romania Gothica II), p. 296.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282440071_Maniakion_-_The_Golden_Torc_in_Late_Roman_and_Early_Byzantine_Army

    Torc with pendants (Typ II)

    (drawing  Zs. Mráv, “Maniakion – The Golden Torc in Late Roman and Early Byzantine Army”, in T. Vida et Alii (edd.), The Frontier World. Romans, Barbarians and Military Culture, Proceedings of the International Conference, Budapest 2015 (Romania Gothica II), p. 296.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282440071_Maniakion_-_The_Golden_Torc_in_Late_Roman_and_Early_Byzantine_Army

    Byzantine Gold Chi-Rho Intaglio Torc, 5th-6th century A.D.https://www.pinterest.fr/pin/217861700698946329/

    Byzantine Braided Gold Necklace with a Medallion representing Fortune and Bellerophon A Bracelet with Pseudo-Medallions. Culture : Byzantine. Period : 6th century A.D. Material : Gold.

    https://www.pinterest.fr/pin/217861700697947993/

    Pectoral with Coins and Pseudo-Medallion [Byzantine] (17.190.1664) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    https://www.pinterest.fr/pin/217861700696886755/

    Byzantine bronze collar or belts formed by nine crosses with decoration of concentric circles, the buckle engraved with four Greek letters: ‘ TOMY ‘. 5th-6th Century AD

    https://www.pinterest.fr/pin/217861700696503930/

    The golden 4th-century neckband with five inlaid precious stones of glass paste in the Centraal Museum, Utrecht

    From Zs. Mráv, “Maniakion – The Golden Torc in Late Roman and Early Byzantine Army”, in T. Vida et Alii (edd.), The Frontier World. Romans, Barbarians and Military Culture, Proceedings of the International Conference, Budapest 2015 (Romania Gothica II), p. 297.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282440071_Maniakion_-_The_Golden_Torc_in_Late_Roman_and_Early_Byzantine_Army

    The late Roman golden torc in the British Museum

    From Zs. Mráv, “Maniakion – The Golden Torc in Late Roman and Early Byzantine Army”, in T. Vida et Alii (edd.), The Frontier World. Romans, Barbarians and Military Culture, Proceedings of the International Conference, Budapest 2015 (Romania Gothica II), p. 297.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282440071_Maniakion_-_The_Golden_Torc_in_Late_Roman_and_Early_Byzantine_Army

    Silver neckband with a large leaf-pendant decorated with a Christogram from a child’s sarcophagus in Carnuntum

    From Zs. Mráv, “Maniakion – The Golden Torc in Late Roman and Early Byzantine Army”, in T. Vida et Alii (edd.), The Frontier World. Romans, Barbarians and Military Culture, Proceedings of the International Conference, Budapest 2015 (Romania Gothica II), p. 297.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282440071_Maniakion_-_The_Golden_Torc_in_Late_Roman_and_Early_Byzantine_Army